Teacher Appreciation Week Deals

Teacher Appreciation Week DEALS

Happy Teacher’s Appreciation Week!

Being an educator has many challenges. Not only do most public school teachers spend their own money on classroom supplies and curricula, but many of them are also underpaid. If you’re an educator you probably know this. But if this is news to you, I hope you’re encouraged to support our nation’s educators and their dedication to teach the next generation. Here are a few ways you can show your support.

  1. Start a school supply drive to help teachers stock their classrooms.
  2. Partner with your child’s teacher by playing an active role in your child’s education.
  3. Send a teacher a “thank you” note and tell them how much they’re appreciated.
  4. Donate to the public library, which helps the facility remain a free resource for teachers and students.
  5. Vote for state officials that support teachers and education.

I might homeschool my own children, but I have many nieces and nephews who attend public school. My prayer is that more people start supporting educators for their sake and for the sake of future America.

How do I—as a homeschool parent—support other educators? Aside from supporting teacher drives, public libraries, and state officials in favor of education (including home education), I also create educational resources!

Nike Anderson's Classroom Free & Affordable Educational Resources

I started Nike Anderson’s Classroom in 2016 when I placed one of the geography resources I created to use in my homeschool for sale on Teacher’s Pay Teachers. I admit I did not expect to make a dime, but I thought the resource could be helpful to another educator. Even more, I knew that if my boys enjoyed this resource, so would other children. That resource is still my best selling product.

50 States of the USA Geography Activities for Kids

As I created more resources to use in my classroom, I shared the wealth with other teachers. I offer many free products, some of which you can find here, and all of my resources are affordable. I also offer resources with diverse images that reflect the average public school classroom. I believe representation for students of color, even in the form of a worksheet, matters.

This week, I’m partnering with TpT to offer educators discounted rates on my most popular resources. It’s my way of saying “thank you.” Whether you teach a homeschool, public school, or private school, you’re greatly appreciated!

Below, are some resources you might want to grab while this promotion is still going. For other resources, visit Nike Anderson’s Classroom.

UPDATE: This offer is no longer available, but be sure to follow my store to be notified when I upload more freebies and discounts.

Happy Teacher’s Appreciation Week!

Click on any of the images below to download.

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More Like this at Nike Anderson’s Classroom!

Nike Anderson's Classroom


 

Teaching Black Women in History

Black Women in History | Resources for Your Classroom

Happy Black History Month!

For those of you who’ve been following my Instastories and are patiently awaiting my latest resources for Black Women in History, wait no more!

I’m pleased to announce that this series is now available at my online shop, Nike Anderson’s Classroom. If this is your first time reading about Nike Anderson’s Classroom, follow me there to be the first to know when I upload new FREEBIES! You will also have access to my most popular resources in geography, black history, reading comprehension, and more.

Creating these resources was no walk in the park. I spent countless hours reading scholarly articles and books, searching for clipart and royalty-free images, reading fine-print to copyright laws, drafting, creating, editing and re-editing—I think you catch my drift, haha. I mention this to say: please respect my work and adhere to the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA).

Like most of my resources, these projects were created to use in my own classroom. Not only do I use what I create, but these resources are also tested and approved by children to ensure they are palatable and age-appropriate. Any child from grades pre-k thru forth-grade can enjoy these resources, but they are most suitable for a second to third-grade reading level.

Why Teach Black History?

Because it’s an integral part of history that typically gets overlooked or glossed over in the classroom. I personally believe black history should be learned and taught year-round and not just in February. Nevertheless, I’m glad that even for just one month we are taking the time to teach children this important history. You wouldn’t believe how many wonderfully intelligent people I meet that know very little about black history. Even worse? People who don’t view it as important enough to teach to their children or in their classrooms.

I wanted to make these resources available to those of you looking to ready your classrooms for Black History Month (or use them year-round!). I know how intimidating and sensitive teaching this material can be, so I made the job easier for you! Below, you will learn the black women highlighted in this series, how to use these resources in your classroom, a detailed description of everything included, the skills these resources help develop, and suggested book titles to enrich your lesson.

Once again, thank you for supporting Nike Anderson’s Classroom!

 


I Chose to Highlight the Following Black Women:


1. Wilma Rudolph

wilma rudolf

In 1960, Wilma Rudolph became the first American woman to win three gold medals in track and field at a single Olympics. She was so fast that her nickname was “Skeeter.” Her ability to break records made her the most popular sprinter of the Rome Olympic Games. She went on to become an international star athlete, teacher, and coach.

Download Activities for Wilma Rudolph

Wilma Rudolph | Black Women in History


2. Sojourner Truth

sojourner truth 1

Sojourner Truth was a famous activist for civil rights and women’s rights. She was best known for her 1851 speech “Ain’t I a Woman?” delivered at the Women’s Rights Convention in Akron, Ohio. In 1864, she met President Abraham Lincoln to discuss helping freedmen from the South. With Lincoln’s help, Truth provided care, food, and shelter to help newly freed slaves survive emancipation.

Download Activities for Sojourner Truth

Sojourner Truth Activities


3. Phillis Wheatley

phyllis wheatley
Phillis Wheatley’s First Published Book of Poems

Phillis Wheatley was the first published African American female poet. In 1773, she published her first book of poetry, Poems on Various Subjects, Religious and Moral. Her poetry brought her fame in England and the American colonies. Wheatley’s poetry even impressed George Washington, whom she had the honor of meeting during the Revolutionary era.

Download Activities for Phillis Wheatley

Phyllis Wheatley Activities


4. Marian Anderson

marian anderson

Marian Anderson earned her fame using her beautiful voice to sing before kings and presidents around the world. In 1936, She sang at the White House for Franklin Roosevelt and his wife, Eleanor. In 1955, Anderson became the first black soloist to sing a part with the New York Metropolitan Opera House. She received a standing ovation before she even sang her song!

Download Activities for Marian Anderson

Marian Anderson


5. Bessie Coleman

bessie coleman

Bessie Coleman was the first African American woman to earn a pilot’s license. But it was not easy. She couldn’t attend any flight schools in America because of her gender and race. Instead, Coleman had to sail all the way to France to attend flight school. After earning her license in 1921, she became a barnstormer and performed air shows.

Download Activities for Bessie Coleman

Bessie Coleman


Thank you for your interest in these resources! These resources are not a curriculum and are best used as a supplement for Black History. The packets include activities to help students learn about black historical figures, Marian Anderson, Phillis Wheatley, Sojourner Truth, Wilma Rudolph, and Bessie Coleman. Similar products, including bundle deals, can be purchased at my online store, Nike Anderson’s Classroom.

There’s no right way to utilize these activities. Feel free to mix and match the ones you’d like to use in your classroom. These activities can be used as classwork, homework, assessments, peer group assignments, booklets, reports, early finisher work, and more!

Download the Entire Set!

Black Women in History

Forty-five activities are included to help develop and reinforce the following skills:

· Reading comprehension

· Critical thinking

· Analyzing

· Creativity

· Fine motor

· Sequencing

· Vocabulary

· Reasoning

· Spelling

· Handwriting

Here’s what’s included: 45 Activities! Each figure includes the following:

1. Read-Aloud: Read a brief biography of the historical figure and practice key terms with your students to help maximize knowledge retention.

2. Coloring Activity: Use this activity to reinforce fun facts, encourage creativity, and discuss one of the historical figure’s famous quotes.

3. Reading Comprehension Activity: Assess mastery of the material using this easy-to-follow reading comprehension and story sequencing activity.

4. Cut and Paste Activity: Use this activity as a gentle, but fun, way to assess comprehension.

5. Handwriting Activity (2 options): These activities are for students who need more handwriting practice (or are early finishers). Beginners may use the tracing activity. Advanced students can use the blank handwriting sheet.

6. Reflection Activity (2 options): Make the material more meaningful to your students by allowing them to reflect and form opinions. For students that have trouble expressing themselves in written language, use the drawing option!

7. Kinesthetic Activity Game: Add to the fun using this True or False jumping game. This kinesthetic activity is a perfect way for students to get those wiggles out and demonstrate what they’ve learned.

Take a Closer Look!

marian anderson preview for nike andersons classroom

Click here for a full preview

 

Student Example

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Suggested Books


 

Click the Image Below for More Black History Resources

Nike Anderson's Classroom Free & Affordable Educational Resources


Photo Credits:
Marian Anderson Facts for KidsKiddle Encyclopedia.
Phillis Wheatley Facts for KidsKiddle Encyclopedia.
Sojourner Truth Facts for KidsKiddle Encyclopedia.
Wilma Rudolph Facts for KidsKiddle Encyclopedia.
Bessie Coleman Facts for KidsKiddle Encyclopedia.
Images may be used under  CC BY-SA 3.0 unless otherwise noted.
50 Random Facts About Nike Anderson

50 Fact about Me | Nike Anderson

I want to take the time to welcome all of my new readers! To shake things up a bit, I figured I’d share a few random facts about myself so that everyone can get to know me better!

Most of you know the basic facts:

  1. My name is Nike, pronounced nee-kay.
  2. I’m half Nigerian, half American.
  3. I have two boys, ages 4 and 8.
  4. I’ve been married for ten years.
  5. I’m a homeschool mom.
  6. I’m an M.Ed who makes educational resources.

Nike Anderson Family Picture

Now, it’s time to share some “not-so-basic” fun facts about the woman sitting behind the computer screen. Some of these may surprise you. To keep things neutral, I Googled “100 questions to ask people.” Google hit me with this VERY random list of questions. I’ll share fifty of them today! Here goes:

1. Where do you consider “home” to be?

Definitely Rhode Island, where I was born and raised. However, I’ve been a Georgian for nearly eleven years now.

 

2. Do you believe in ghosts?

No.

 

3. Are you religious?

No. I’m one of those “cooky” people that find the term restrictive. I believe that Jesus Christ is the son of God, died for our sins, and defeated death by rising three days later. I don’t live my life by laws, but by faith.

 

4. If you could travel anywhere in the world right now, where would you go?

I would love to visit Egypt.

 

5. If you could have dinner with any of the presidents, who would you choose? Why?

Since this is just for fun, I’ll say I would’ve loved to have dinner with JFK if I were living during his presidency. Why? Because he seemed to be a fountain of wisdom.  My favorite quote from him? The one from the 1961 address to the United Nations, “Conformity is the jailer of freedom and the enemy of growth.”

 

6. What is your dream job?

I always wanted to be a New York Times best-selling author.

 

7. Who is your role model? Why?

My role model is my mom. She has so many characteristics I aspire to. She’s beautiful, intelligent, loyal, strong, talented, humble, encouraging, and generous.

 

8. Do you prefer Coke or Pepsi?

Coke.

 

9. Do you prefer Cheetos or Doritos?

Doritos.

 

10. Do you eat breakfast in the morning?

Yes. One of my favorite meals is a spinach omelet…with cheese, of course.

 

11. When you go to the beach, do you sunbathe or swim more?

I prefer to get into the water. No sunbathing, here. I’ve got loads of melanin, haha. 😊

 

12. Have you ever ridden a city bus before?

All the time. When I was a teenager, I rode the city bus all over Providence. In fact, I took the city bus every day to get to school.

 

13. Have you ever traveled outside of the country? If so, where?

Yes. I’ve visited 5 countries—England, France, Spain, Nigeria, and the Netherland’s. Some of the cities I visited were London, Bath, Stratford Upon Avon, Paris, Barcelona, Madrid, Seville, Amsterdam, and Lagos.

 

14. If you got arrested, what do you think it would be for?

I don’t like imagining these types of situations.

 

15. What is your favorite childhood memory?

I remember my mother helping me get ready for a play that I starred in when I was in elementary school. While doing my hair and makeup, we had some good laughs. When everything was all said and done, she told me I looked beautiful. It was the first time I considered that it might possibly be true—that I was beautiful.

 

16. What was your favorite song two years ago? What is it now?

Hmmmm. Two years ago, I loved the song “Victor’s Crown” by Darlene Zschech. Anytime I got a moment alone, I would bellow this song out in the car. These days, my favorite song is “Holy Spirit” by Jesus Culture.

 

17. What teacher have you had that’s made the biggest impact on your life? How?

Shout out to Ms. Latessa, my former elementary school teacher. She planted the seed for my love of writing. She was the first person to tell me I was a great writer.

 

18. Are you a cat person or a dog person?

If I had to choose, I’d say I’m more of a dog person. Truthfully, I LOVE both!

 

19. What is a quote from any movie that you know off the top of your head?

“If you want to be somebody. If you want to go somewhere. You’d better wake up and pay attention,” from Sister Act II.

 

20. What are you most afraid of?

I try not to meditate on my fears.

 

21. If superheroes were real, who would you want to protect your city?

Black Panther. He has access to the strongest metal in the world.

 

22. What is the silliest reason you’ve ever cried?

Someone forgot to wash my son’s face. He was three at the time, I just had a new baby, and I accused my family (who was helping us) of neglecting him while I was asleep. I blame it on the hormones. I did apologize to them, though.

 

23. If you could be a character on any show, what show would you choose? Why?

And here’s where I admit that I don’t watch TV. Back in the day, it would’ve been The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air. 

 

24. You’re stuck on an island with no way off and no one knows you’re there, what three items do you have with you?

Again, I don’t like imagining up negative hypothetical situations.

 

25. What is the name of one song you know all the words to?

One song most people would probably be shocked I know (and love!) is “You’re the One That I Want,” from Grease.

 

26. Are you a sore loser?

No. You can always learn from failure.

 

27. Do you sleep with your closet doors open or closed?

Closed.

 

28. Would you rather be attacked by a big bear or a swarm of bees?

You already know I’m not going to answer this.

 

29. What is your biggest pet peeve?

Water on the floor. I hate touching it with my unsuspecting bare feet.

 

30. Where would you bury hidden treasure if you had some?

Wouldn’t you like to know, haha. 😊

 

31. Would you ever strip or pose nude for a photo in a magazine? For a movie?

No.

 

32. What has been your best Halloween costume thus far?

When I was a little girl, my mom made me the most beautiful Belle costume. Beauty and the Beast was my favorite Disney movie at the time.

 

33. Are you stubborn?

Yes. I’m working on it, though.

 

34. Do you sing in the shower? In the car?

Totally. I sing in both! Just ask the driver in the car next to me at the stop light.

 

35. Do you take vitamins daily?

Daily, no. Regularly, yes.

 

36. Have you ever cried because you were so happy?

Yes. On my wedding day (and on everyone else’s wedding day). I also have kids who do adorable things, so happy tears are a regular thing for me.

 

37. Can you swim without plugging your nose?

Yes.

 

38. Have you ever won a contest?

Yes. A very nerdy one when I was a kid. I had to belt-out facts about the history of Thanksgiving in front of the entire school on a stage full of contenders. I knew EVERY single fact, lol.

 

39. Do you want kids? How many?

Yes, I want kids. I already have two beautiful, fun-loving boys.

 

40. Are you missing anyone right now?

Yes. My Rhode Island family and my five siblings. If you’re reading this, call me.

 

41. Do you smile at strangers as you walk by them?

I’m going to say no. Unless I make eye contact with them.

 

42. Do you think your life will change drastically before 2020?

I hope so. The only thing constant is change.

 

43. How do you react when people talk badly about you?

I honestly don’t know when people talk badly about me, which is a good thing because what they think about me is none of my business.

 

44. Where did you get the shirt you are currently wearing?

I’m wearing a tunic and I got it from Goodwill for fifty cents.

 

45. What has been your favorite gift you’ve been given?

I can’t speak on favorites, but a memorable one was from my college friend. She gave me an inexpensive clutch bag with laminated inserts where she wrote out a ton of our favorite memories together. I still have it to this day and read through it sometimes.

 

46. If you had to delete one year out of your life completely, which would you choose?

I wouldn’t delete any of it. Everything, good and bad, made me the woman I am today. So cliche, right? But it’s true.

 

47. What is your favorite thing about school?

Grade school is a distant memory for me, but my favorite thing about school was homework. I loved worksheets!

 

48. Is there something that happened in your past that you hate talking about?

No. I’m transparent about my past. It is my testimony that helps bring hope to others.

 

49. Who was the last person you were on the phone with?

My mom.

 

50. Do you get jealous easily?

Yes. But I don’t stay jealous for long. I’ve learned strategies to conquer the green-eyed monster whenever it threatens to steal my joy. Perhaps I’ll write a future post about it.

(EDIT: Read 12 Ways I Overcame Jealousy)


 

That concludes my list. Did any of these surprise you? Can you relate to any of my answers? Don’t be shy! Let us know in the comments!

Realistic Ways My Kids Stay Entertained

5 Realistic Ways My Kids Stay Entertained During Winter Break

Winter break is here and with it enters the dreadful question, “How on earth am I going to keep my children entertained?” Trust me, as a momma to two young boys, I know this dilemma all too well. But before you allow the television to takeover this winter break, I want to share some alternative ideas to help balance out the inevitable screen-time while helping to keep those little minds sharp.  These methods work so well for our household. Even better? They are realistic and require very little effort on your part. So, let’s get into it, shall we?

5 Realistic Ways My Kids Stay Entertained During Winter Break

 

  1. Read, Read, and Read Some More! For leisure, that is! We all know that reading is fundamental, but why? For starters, reading improves cognitive development in children—that is, your child’s ability to process and recall information, solve problems, and make decisions. It’s easy to see that reading is a great exercise for the brain, but did you also know reading can reduce your child’s stress levels and improve their vocabulary and concentration? More reasons to visit your local library this winter break and let ‘em loose! Books we love? Basically, anything Pete the Cat, Frog and Toad, and Mo Willems related. Don’t have readers or book lovers? Try audiobooks!

 

  1. Break Out the Paint Supplies. If you’ve never heard about the benefits of painting, allow me to inform you. Obviously, painting encompasses a multitude of creative benefits, but it can also provide therapeutic benefits for children and provide them a platform to better communicate their emotions. Even more? Painting helps children develop decision-making skills and it increases the mobility skills necessary for mental and physical development. My boys have been loving their paint therapy sessions! I can’t believe how long this activity actually keeps them quiet.

 

  1. Control Screen-Time. Let’s not act like screen-time isn’t going to happen for most of us. But you don’t have to feel entirely guilty about giving your child a tablet and sending them to their room. Instead of letting them spend hours watching YouTube videos of other kids playing with toys (Please tell me my kids aren’t the only weirdos that do this, haha), make your children a playlist of educational YouTube channels that are parent-approved. Here are some YouTube videos we love! Additionally, Schoolhouse Rock videos have become a favorite around here.

 

  1. Give Brainteasers a Try. Puzzles, mazes, and riddles are fun ways for children to challenge their cognitive thought processes. In short, these games can help reduce boredom and improve concentration, memory, and brain strength. Education.com is a great resource for all things games, mazes, and puzzles for all ages. I’ve talked about how helpful Education.com has been to our homeschool in the past (Read about it here), so it’s a pleasure to feature this resource in today’s post. Since my boys love brainteasers, we’re excited to download additional resources at Education.com to help combat winter break boredom. Check out their sample activity below and get in on the fun! Although this is a partnership, all opinions are my own. 

Education.com Maze
Splash around and help our little sea friends find their way home! Check out additional games and resources at Education.com! FREE Download! Get the answer key.

5. Learn a new skill. Whether it’s baking, origami, playing an instrument, or exploring a new sport, every child has an interest they don’t mind spending hours mastering. School breaks are the perfect time to challenge your child to learn something new. The key is to set realistic goals. A checklist of goodies to bake, perhaps, or learn how to play a song on the keyboard. My second-grader has taken it upon himself to learn about computer programing, so he checked out some books from the library and started taking virtual courses with Khan Academy to learn the basics. Whatever they choose, it should be totally up to them—and fun!


 

I hope everyone enjoys their winter break! I want to end by saying that learning should not only be fun but a way of life that inspires children beyond the classroom. At least that’s how we see it!  And now it’s your turn: What are your winter break tips? Let us know in the comments. And, P.S. it’s okay to say your winter break tip is to simply survive, haha. We get you!

DIY Curriculum

10 Easy Steps to a DIY Curriculum

I talk to many homeschool parents, and the common concern I get is that they don’t have the money to buy a curriculum. This was me two years ago. I was in a place where I wanted to homeschool my kids, but couldn’t rub two dimes together. It was a year of serious transition for our family. In a nutshell, I had to make the decision whether I would spend our disposable income on curricula or experiences.

If you’ve ever visited my Instagram page, then you know I chose to invest in experiences. As the mother of two small boys, I wanted them to have fun learning and experiencing new things. Not having the money to fund those experiences was NOT an option, so I forwent curriculum purchases. Instead, I invested my time in developing a customized curriculum that suited their interests and learning needs.

Of course, I must mention that I studied curriculum development in my Master’s program, but that did not mean I knew what I was doing. However, my background did give me the confidence to try developing a curriculum on my own. You do not need any degrees, but I do suggest reading up on curriculum development to gain some insight—and confidence!

There are a variety of ways to create a curriculum, but I chose what I like to call the Break-Down Method. That is, taking something overwhelming and breaking it down into sizable chunks. This method made curriculum planning less intimidating. If you’re looking to create your own curriculum and don’t know where to start, perhaps this method can help you, too. Here are ten easy steps to a do-it-yourself curriculum, using the core subject, science, as an example.


10 Easy Steps to a DIY Curriculum

1. Be responsible.

Read the legal requirements for your stateEvery state has their own requirements for homeschool families. Please take the time to read these requirements to ensure you are operating within the law for your state of residence. These guidelines can also be very helpful, as they usually entail what subjects you are required to teach your children.

EXAMPLE: By law, I was required to teach my kindergartner language arts, mathematics, social studies, and science in the state of Georgia.

 

2. Borrow a skeleton.

For your curriculum, that is. During my first year of homeschool, I used the Georgia Standards of Excellence (GSE) for my skeleton. This allowed me to kill two birds with one stone because I knew using this framework for my curriculum also meant I’d be honoring state requirements. The following year, I used books from the “What Your Kindergartner Needs to Know” series. I borrowed this series from the library. The series covers all elementary grade levels.

How did I use these resources, exactly? For each core subject, I wrote down everything my child should know for their grade-level, and then I found the resources to execute those goals. For example, if in kindergarten my child should learn about animals and habitats for science, I would borrow books from the library, look for free courses and activity ideas, and download free practice worksheets for those particular topics.

EXAMPLE: Take a look at the list I generated for kindergarten science topics from GSE

Earth and Space Science

  • Time Patterns (day to night and night to day) and objects (sun, moon, stars) in the day and night sky
  • Earth Materials (soil, rocks, water, and air)

Physical Science

  • Physical Attributes of Objects
  • Types of Motion

Life Science

  • Living & Nonliving Things
  • Classification of Organisms
  • Five Senses

3. Add some bones of your own.

You may have borrowed the skeleton, but it’s important to make it yours! You know how much I preach here about developing a vision and mission statement for your homeschool that outlines your educational philosophy and goals. Keep your goals in mind while adding some bones to the skeleton of your curriculum.

How can you make it yours? By knowing how your children learn best, what they enjoy learning, and a method of education that works best for your family.  If you have a techy child, try free virtual classes, educational computer games, and video lessons to fulfill your curriculum goals.

EXAMPLE: Our vision for homeschool includes making room for academic freedom by incorporating some form of self-directed learning. That means I give my boys a say in what they’d like to learn. When I developed their science curriculum, we incorporated geography into our life-science lessons. We also learned about the solar system because that was what they were into.

As a note, I only incorporated these topics into our formal lessons because my boys were too young to research them on their own. As my oldest became more fluent in reading, he could then read up on any topic of interest, which is self-directed learning in its truest form.

 

4. Finalize your topics for each subject. 

What topics will you cover for Language Arts? Math? Science? Other subjects you’ll be covering? List all your topics for each subject on a spreadsheet, table, or journal to refer to later on.

EXAMPLE: From the science list of topics I generated from GSE, I decided to teach the five senses, animal classification, parents and offspring, habitats, weather, and planets. Other topics, such as those in physical science, were taught the following year with The Magic School Bus curriculum.

 

5. Breakdown your topics by term. 

How will you breakdown your topics? By quarter? Semester? Whatever you choose, assign your topics to a given term for each subject. This makes it easier to administer evaluations, tests, and other assessments.

EXAMPLE: We assigned our topics by semester. For science, we studied the five senses and life science topics during our first semester. During the second semester, we took on weather and astronomy, as well as got more hands on with science related fieldtrips and experiments.

Science

6. Breakdown topics into months. 

Assign topics for each month in all your subjects. This should be relatively easy if you’ve already written down all the topics you’ll cover for the year. You’ll have to adjust this throughout the school year depending on how long it takes your child to master the information. No worries, do this step anyway.

EXAMPLE: During the first month of school, we studied phonics and word families for language arts, simple addition for math, the seven continents for social studies, and the five senses and physical attributes for science. Here’s an example of our science breakdown for kindergarten.

Science Curriculum

7.  Breakdown topics into weeks. 

Breaking down topics ensures you cover good ground, and makes it easier to control the pace. If I try to cram too much information in each week, and my child isn’t retaining it, slowing down throws off my entire curriculum. However, if I allow for some wiggle room by spacing out my topics, we can jump ahead if we need to. I’d rather jump ahead than have to slow down. Both are inevitable, though.

EXAMPLE: When we learned the five senses for kindergarten science, assigning one sense per week was ideal because it gave the information enough time to sink in. This wasn’t the original plan, but I later found it to be the better plan.

Kindergarten Science

8. Breakdown topics into days.

If it’s possible to break your topics down even further, do so. I found that breaking my topics down into days by charting them made me feel better prepared. This meant having an objective for that day, jotting down relevant questions to ask your student, and anything else that’ll keep you from asking ‘what next?’ during your school day.

EXAMPLE: Keeping with our science theme, this would be the following breakdown for Week One of studying the five senses, concentrating on the sense of hearing. This breakdown is based on thirty-minute lessons.

Kindergarten Science

9. Gather your resources.

Once you’ve decided on a schedule that works, now it’s time to gather your resources for the topics you’ll be teaching. I’ve got a great list of FREE homeschool resources, here! You can also visit my shop, Nike Anderson’s Classroom, for free and low-cost educational resources.

Remember to think beyond the internet. In addition to free books, your local library may offer free classes, workshops, and STEM kits that may tie into your curriculum. You can also check out your local zoo or museum. Many of these places offer classes to homeschool families. Ask them for a schedule of these classes and see if any of the topics fit in with your curriculum.

Lastly, don’t forget to snatch up any free informational brochures, pamphlets, or flyers located at your local dentist or doctor’s office, museum, zoo, library, grocery store, computer store, etc. Some of these informational texts can tie in nicely with your curriculum. For example, if you’re studying the human body, the doctor’s office is a great place to get free information. Just make sure it’s okay to take the pamphlets home.

EXAMPLE: For Week One of studying the five senses, I may need the following resources:

Science

10. Decide how you’ll test knowledge.

With any curriculum, it’s a great idea to implement some form of assessment. Assessments are a fantastic way of knowing when to move on or slow down. Decide how and when you will test your child. Will it be weekly? Monthly? Quarterly? Annually? Remember that the more frequently you assess your child, the quicker you’ll catch on to any problems they might be having.

A test doesn’t necessarily have to be taken in a quiet room with a fill-in-the-blank worksheet. You don’t even have to subject your child to a grading system. There are so many ways to find out whether your child is mastering the material being taught. We do oral quizzes all the time in our homeschool, and my boys don’t even realize they’re taking a “quiz.” You can also have them do a project, an oral presentation, or write a report on what they’ve learned. In fact, you can let them decide how they’d like to demonstrate their knowledge.

EXAMPLE: I already mentioned that we like oral quizzes, but we’ve also had our fair share of fill-in-the-blank quizzes. Another fun way we assessed mastery of the material was through making books. During our kindergarten year, my son would draw pictures in his “book” about what he learned, and then he “read” his book to me. By the end of his kindergarten year, he could start incorporating simple words in his books. I scheduled some sort of assessment every week.



Other things to consider.

  •  Plan your curriculum around events if possible. For instance, in spring our local museum hosts STEM classes. The week that these classes take place are a great time to cover stem related topics
  •  You don’t have to plan all at once. Once you have an overview for the school year, you can breakdown your topics into detail on the monthly or even weekly basis. I personally planned the details every week. But I also tried monthly planning as well. If you want to get the planning over with, plan the year out in detail before the start of the school year.
  •  Will you need help? For subjects you don’t feel well versed in, will you sign your child up for outside classes? Hire a tutor? Have a friend or relative teach the subject? Make sure you factor all this in.
  •  Will you supplement? I purchased workbooks and other materials to supplement curricula for certain subject areas. Think about what you may need to supplement your curriculum.
  •  Fieldtrips. It’s helpful to have a good idea of the fieldtrips you’d like to take during the school year. Decide the best time of year to take these fieldtrips and plan your curriculum accordingly. For instance, you probably don’t want to go to the zoo during the cold winter season, so planning life science curricula and subsequent activities during warmer months is ideal.
  •  Give yourself some wiggle room. Things are probably not going to go as planned. That’s okay. Even families using a boxed curriculum fall behind or get bumped ahead of the curriculum. Give yourself some grace.

 

Lastly, I want to mention there’s no such thing as a perfect curriculum. Every curriculum has gaps—even the most elite curriculum. Therefore, I can’t say this is an all comprehensive planning guide. I can attest, however, that this method helped me tremendously during my first homeschool year. I hope it helps you, too.

YOUR TURN! Anything you want to add? Help other parents and let them know your tips down below!
 

 

 

Free Homeschool Deals

30 FREE Homeschool Deals That’ll Help You Save Some Coins

Homeschool can get really expensive. But the great news is it can also be relatively free!

Read the updated post, here, featuring over 60 FREE legitimate homeschool deals you’ll actually use.

Here are twenty FREE resources to help you save some coins this upcoming school year. Of course, most of these resources require you to at least have access to a printer and some ink. Other than that, all you really need are some basic school supplies.

Taking advantage of free curricula is a great way to test what types of subjects, lesson plans, and teaching styles help your child thrive best.  It is also a great way to save money for what really matters—lots of field-trips, adventures, and social opportunities!

So, without further ado:

30 FREE Homeschool Deals That’ll Help You Save Some Coins!

 

1. Free Homeschool Deals

This site offers free unit studies, supplement materials, and much more. Free resources are available for any subject and grade level.

2. Easy Peasy Homeschool

This site offers free curricula in all core subjects for levels pre-k through high school.  This is also a great site for elective courses like physical education, foreign language, and more. The reviews are mixed on this curriculum, but people like it for the most part. The common complaint is that it’s not challenging enough for advanced students.

3. How to Homeschool for Free

This site offers free unit studies, electives, and other resources for homeschool families. You can find materials in all core subjects for all grade levels.

4. K12 Education

This is an online public school, not a homeschool. Therefore, you will be subject to public school laws. However, this program is great for families on the go. Some people love it. Others hate it. The common complaint is the program can be stressful because there’s too much busywork and not enough flexibility. A great benefit is that you will receive free school supplies, books, and other materials needed for your courses.

5. Homeschool Math.net

This site is a great lesson-plan resource for mathematics. The site only serves up to seventh grade so you won’t find much for high school students, here. The great thing about these lesson plans is they come with video instructions/lectures, as well as follow-up worksheets. You can find any math subject from simple addition to pre-algebra.

6.  Homeschool Buyers Co-op

This site offers a wonderful database full of free homeschool curricula and resources. You can even find promos, coupons, and great homeschool deals on just about anything you need to plan your curriculum.

7.   The Pioneer Woman

This site offers another great database for free homeschool resources, awesome tidbits on motherhood, and more!

8.  Khan Academy

This is free a virtual academy for pre-k through high school students. You may select a course in any core area of your choice, or create a course of your own. What’s unique about this academy is that you’ll find free courses in engineering, computing, economics, and finance, among others. They even have SAT prep and other prep courses for other standardized tests.

9.  Teachers pay Teachers

Not only can you find MY free resources here, but a plethora of other free resources and curricula for grades pre-k through high school.  What’s great about this site is that all materials are made for teachers by teachers. Check out my growing shop to find some free goodies! There will also be an upcoming Back-to-School sale soon!

10.  Encouraging Moms at Home

This site shares an awesome preschool weather unit freebie. Take advantage! You can also find other great deals and homeschool tips on this site.

11.  Midwest Modern Momma

This site shares a free United States unit study that can be adjusted for any age. The study comes with a load of free printables. Check it out!

12.  Cornerstone Confessions.com

If you’re looking for a free science curriculum for pre-k through second grade, look no further. Cornerstone Confessions shares a Magic School Bus science unit for the entire school year! This unit is full of awesome experiments and activities. If you already have a Netflix subscription (or other subscription that offers the Magic School Bus series) this course is completely free.

13. Ambleside Online

If you’re a fan of the Charlotte Mason method, you’ll love this free resource.  This site offers free courses from pre-k- through high school in all core subjects. Ambleside Online also offers free Bible courses.

14.  Budget Homeschool

 This site offers free study guides, lesson plans, books, and more!

15.  An Old Fashioned Education

Are you old school? Well, this is the site for you! It’s important to note that this site is Christian inspired. The site offers core subjects as well as other subjects like etiquette, speaking, and art appreciation, among many others.

16.  Classroom Freebies, Too

This site is a great resource for all things “freebies!”

17.  Curr Click

This site offers free classes and curricula in all core subjects.  I do advise, however, to make sure all the clickable links work for a particular course—especially BEFORE you start depending on them as your homeschool curriculum.   I’ve come across some links that no longer work.  However, there’s some good stuff on this site.

18.  Free Kids Books

This site has a book for every age from toddlerhood through adulthood. And, yes, the books are free to download! Or, you can simply read them online. What I really like about this site is most of the books have ratings. The site also offers a user-friendly category search so you can search for anything from coloring books to early reader books in a jiffy.

Free Kids Classic Books

19.  Lesson Pathways

This is a curriculum-building site that offers free resources for curriculum customization.  The resources offered covers grades K-5. Registration is free and gives you access to some awesome goodies.

20.  Guest Hollow.com

This site offers a free Science of the Seasons curriculum, Geography curriculum, and many others.  There are some great resources for all ages, including high school students. Go take a look!

21. Scholastic

Scholastic has a teacher’s corner that serves teachers of all grade levels. This site is full of lesson plans, unit plans, teacher guides, activities, and more. Not to mention, they offer recommendations on awesome books to accompany your lessons!

Free Homeschool Deals

22. Crayola

Believe it or not, Crayola offers free lesson plans for language arts, math, STEAM, social studies, and, of course—art!

Free Homeschool Deals

 

23. School Zone

School Zone has a program called Anywhere Teacher. If you sign up for a free subscription, you have access to 28 educational activities that rotate monthly. The program connects children ages 2-8 to online learning and resources.

Free Homeschool Deals

24. Hoffman Academy

It doesn’t get any better than free online piano lessons. We’ve personally taken advantage of this resource, so I can truly say that my kids enjoy these fun, quirky lessons. The lessons are step by step and offer units for beginner and intermediate levels.

Free Homeschool Deals

25. STEMfinity

STEMfinity offers a database for all things STEM. Check out their resources for activities and lesson plans for science, technology, engineering, and math.

FREE Homeschool Deals

26. Code.org

Code.org offers free videos, games, and lesson plans for all things code. This site serves parents and teachers of grades pre-k through high school. It is also user-friendly for independent learners. My second-grader utilizes this site frequently to improve his coding skills.

Free Homeschool Deals

27. Scratch

Scratch allows students to program their own stories, games, and animations. The site also includes guides and tutorials for parents and teachers. This is another site my kids frequent. It is very kid-user friendly. My second-grader coded several games and animations using this resources.

Free Homeschool Deals

28. Kidzone

Looking for worksheets for your children? Kidzone has got you covered. All worksheets are printable for early learning through grade five. You can find worksheets on letters, numbers, shapes, colors, and more. The site also offers worksheets for phonics, math, science, geography, and more. Lesson plans and thematic units are also available. This was my go-to source for Kindergarten worksheets.

FREE Homeschool Deals

29. Education.com

Education.com offers worksheets, lesson plans, games, and more for grades pre-k through high school. They offer resources for math, reading, writing, science, social studies, foreign language, and more. Be sure to check out their Teaching Tools section because you can read the ratings and comments on the lesson plans they offer.

Free Homeschool Deals

30. National Geographic Kids

National Geographic Kids is a great virtual dictionary for fun facts about animals, geography, the solar system, and more. The site also offers educational games, quizzes, and videos for kids of all ages. We loved it as a supplement to our curriculum on life science and habitats. We also used this resource to supplement our geography curriculum.

Free Homeschool Deals

 

31. Nike Anderson’s Classroom

As a bonus, I’m including my growing online shop, Nike Anderson’s Classroom. I offer free resources for pre-k through second grade. Check out my free geography resources, reading and comprehension worksheets, memory verse activities, Black history worksheets, and more! Be sure to follow me on TpT to be the first to know when I upload a new free resource. I literally uploaded five FREE resources today, so you don’t want to miss out!

Nike's Classroom


 

That concludes my list. I do hope at least one of these free resources is new to you.

Your Turn!

If you have other resources you’d like to mention, let us know down below! Sharing is caring!!!!

How to Homeschool

10 Things You Should Know Before You Homeschool

Thinking about homeschooling your children, or know someone who is? As a newbie homeschooler, I would have been lost if it weren’t for the homeschool veterans that helped me put everything into perspective. So, here I am paying it forward. Not that I consider myself a veteran, but I’ve learned a thing or two. Here are my top ten things every prospective homeschooler should know and/or consider before their first year of homeschool. And if you’re already in the homeschooling game, perhaps you may still find some of these tips useful.   


10 Things You Should Know Before You Homeschool


1. The Law

In the United States, you have the right to provide your child with a home-based education. Homeschool is a legal practice in all fifty U.S. states and has been since 1993. However, there are legal requirements you should know regarding homeschool. Requirements differ depending on where you live, so it’s best to research the requirements for your state. I can offer you a summary here, but be sure to do the research for yourself for up-to-date legal requirements.

Homeschool Law Breakdown

There are four types of states regarding homeschool laws: The first type is a No Regulation State. A no regulation state has no requirements for homeschool parents. The second type is a Low Regulation State. A low regulation state only requires parents to send notification of their intent to homeschool. The third type is a Moderate Regulation State. A moderate regulation state requires parents to send notification of their intent to homeschool, as well as test scores and/ or professional evaluation of student progress. Finally, the fourth type is a High Regulation State. A high regulation state may require notification, test scores, curriculum approval by the state, teacher qualification of parents, or home visits by state officials, among other things. Click here to get a snapshot of the category your residing state falls into.

I can’t stress enough to do your own research. Laws change all the time and there are always details to consider. To help structure your research, seek to answer the following questions:

  • Is there a compulsory attendance?
  • Are there required subjects?
  • Is there a deadline?
  • Do you have to keep records?
  • Can you teach other kids?
  • Can you hire a tutor?
  • Do you need a college degree?
  • Are there required standardized tests?
  • What are your other rights?
  • Did any laws change?

I know. It all seems so scary. If you need any legal help, the Homeschool Defense Legal Association will point you in the right direction.

2. Your Vision

So, what’s a vision, anyway?

I like the way leadership expert, Jessie Lyn Stoner, defines vision: “Vision is knowing who you are, where you’re going, and what will guide your journey.” It is made up of your purpose, picture of the future, and your values. Now let’s apply that to your homeschool. Ask yourself these questions:

  • What is your purpose for homeschooling and what value will it provide to your family?
  • What will your picture look like at the end of your homeschool journey when your purpose of fulfilled?
  • What are your core values and how will they support your purpose?

Make sure you write your vision down! Here’s an example from my vision and mission statement for the upcoming school year.

Nike Anderson's Homeschool Vision Statement

3. The Benefits

Understanding the benefits of your decision to homeschool will keep you going when things get tough. Be sure to do thorough research on all of the benefits you’ll be providing for your children (and yourself!) during your homeschool experience. Write them down or print them out. Here are a few statistics from the National Home Education Research Institute:

  • Homeschool students score above average on achievement tests regardless of their parents’ level of formal education or their family’s household income.
  • The home-educated typically score 15 to 30 percentile points above public-school students on standardized academic achievement tests.
  • Homeschool students are increasingly being actively recruited by colleges
  • The home-educated are doing well, typically above average, on measures of social, emotional, and psychological development. Research measures include peer interaction, self-concept, leadership skills, family cohesion, participation in community service, and self-esteem.

It’s important to understand that some statistics in favor of homeschool, and those against homeschool, can be biased. Instead, make it a habit to write down your personal list of benefits that you’ve experienced as a result of homeschool. Here’s mine. Perhaps I’ll explain these in depth in another blog post.

  • Improved Focus. We’re able to modify our learning environment to ensure the best possible focus.
  • Close-knit Family. We have the opportunity to strengthen our relationship with one another.
  • Tailored Education. We can choose a curriculum that best suits our family and make necessary modifications if needed.
  • Tailored Pace. We can speed up or slow down our lessons depending on the level of mastery. 
  • Lifestyle Learning. There’s very little separation between real-life and “school.” Everything’s a lesson!
  • Lifestyle Freedom. Our schedule is super flexible. We can vacation off-season and visit attractions during low-traffic hours.

4. Discounts & Free Resources

Homeschool has the potential to get costly, especially for beginners who are tempted to purchase everything that veterans recommend. Research free resources in your area. You might be amazed by all your community has to offer for little to no cost. The local library is a great place to start, as they are typically connected to many resources that offer free admission to the museum, zoo, aquarium, and much more. You can even find free or low-cost classes at your local museum, zoo, aquarium, capital building, and education center.

Of course, there are many free resources on the Web. Youtube has great educational channels for all ages, and there are websites galore that are full of access to free educational resources. Websites I’ve used frequently for free printables and curricula are:

  • Education.comFree printables for core and elective subjects for grades pre-k thru high school. Also provides games, activities, lesson plans, and more.
  • KidzoneFree worksheets for pre-k thru grade 5.
  • Teachers pay TeachersFree lesson plans, worksheets, games, and resources from experienced educators around the world.
  • AllinOneHomeschoolA free online curriculum for core and elective subjects for grades pre-k thru high school.
  • Khan AcademyFree online courses, classes, and practice.
  • ScholasticFree resources and tools, printables, and more.
  • Hoffman AcademyFree music lessons.
  • Nike Anderson’s Classroom(Shameless plug, hehe!) Free printable worksheets for pre-k thru grade 2 designed for kinesthetic learners.

This list doesn’t even make a dent so please do your own research. New resources I haven’t tried but am just learning about are:

  • CrayolaFree lesson plans and resources for language arts, math, STEM, social studies, art, and more.
  • Homeschool Buyers CoopFree virtual field trip lesson plans, resources, tips, and more.

Read FREE Homeschool DEALS Your Wallet Will LOVE for more resources.

*******You May Also Qualify for Teacher Discounts******

Don’t forget you are a teacher, too! I mean, I know this should be a given, but it took me a while to accept that title. So make sure you attend teacher drives in your area and take advantage of the free school supplies they give out at the start of the school year.

Even more? You can receive a teacher’s discount at participating supercenters, bookstores, and office supply stores. I’ve personally received discounts at my local bookstore, but am now learning there are so many stores that may offer homeschoolers a teacher’s discount. Keep in mind that you may have to show your declaration of intent, homeschool membership card, or HSLDA membership card. Here are some stores you might want to try according to the HSLDA.

·         Adobe.com

·         A.C. Moore Arts and Crafts

·         Ann Taylor Loft

·         Apple Store

·         Barnes & Noble

·         Big Lots

·         The Book Barn

·         Books-a-Million

·         Colonial Williamsburg

·         The Container Store

·         Creation Museum

·         Dell

·         Generation Joshua

·         Goodwill

·         Half Price Books

·         HSLDA Online Academy

·         J. Crew

·         Joann Fabrics

·         Legoland

·         Michaels

·         Mount Vernon

·         New York and Co.

·         Office Depot

·         Office Max

·         Patrick Henry College

·         Ripley’s Attractions, Gatlinburg, TN

5. The Types of Homeschool Groups

Basically, there are different types of homeschool groups that cater to the needs of different families. The best way I found out about the homeschool groups in my area was through a Facebook search. I simply searched “homeschool groups near me” and requested to join the groups I was interested in. Please note that there is an additional process to be an official member of the homeschool group of your choice. Joining a Facebook group may give you access to information about that group, but many groups require an application, a membership fee, references, a background check, mandatory volunteering, and more. Be sure to seek out the group administrator for additional requirements. Here are some examples of homeschool groups to consider:

  • Christian Homeschool Groups—A group that provides homeschool families with information, fellowship, and learning opportunities centered around Christian beliefs.
  • Secular Homeschool Groups—A homeschool group that provides non-religious families with information, fellowship, and learning opportunities.
  • African American/ Ethnic Homeschool Groups—A homeschool group that connects African Americans and/or various ethnic groups with one another.
  • STEAM Homeschool Groups—A homeschool group that helps families provide their children with an education in the areas of science, technology, engineering, art, and mathematics.
  • Homeschool Playgroups—A laid back homeschool group focused on providing children with fellowship opportunities in the form of open-ended play.
  • Classical Education Homeschool Groups—Connects homeschool families who follow the classical education method. This group usually offers classes by parents who specialize in teaching classical education.
  • Tutorial Co-op—A co-op for children of any age in need of specialized tutoring in a particular subject. Usually, taught by qualified parents and/or teachers.
  • Parent-support Co-op—A co-op for homeschool parents to gather, fellowship, and minister to one another.
  • Traditional Homeschool Co-op—A co-op that’s usually parent-led designed to provide homeschool children with elective classes, field-trips, socialization, and more.

6. How Your Children Learn.

If you plan to use a curriculum, make sure it suits the way your child learns best. There are different types of learning styles. Here’s a list of six different ways your child may prefer to learn.

  • Visual, or learning using pictures, images, and spatial understanding.
  • Aural, or learning using sound and music.
  • Verbal, or learning using words, both in speech and writing.
  • Physical, or learning using your body, hands, and sense of touch.
  • Logical, or learning using logic, reasoning, and systems.
  • Social, or learning in groups.
  • Solitary, or preferring to work alone and use self-study.

Scholastic offers a simple “Learning Style Quiz” you can do with your child to point you in the right direction. When I sought out a curriculum for my children, who are visual and physical learners, I made sure to implement a curriculum that involves games, physical movement, and stimulating visual prompts and videos. But even in doing so, we’re not limited to the curriculum. I’ve created many resources, learning games, and projects along the way to enhance classroom learning. You can, too! Pinterest is your best friend. So is your imagination!

7.  You Don’t Need an Extensive Curriculum

Well, maybe you do if you live in a high regulation state that must approve your curriculum choice. However, for the rest of us, an extensive curriculum with all the bells and whistles isn’t necessary. Trust me when I say, “What will always matter most is how much you put into a curriculum. Not what you get out of it.” When a parent places a great deal of effort into their child’s education they will never come up short—regardless of the curriculum choice. I am living proof. Due to financial hardship in the past, I’ve had to get super creative. I relied heavily on free curricula, library resources, and my creative juices. If you’ve been following me since Day One, you know this. These days, I am blessed to purchase curricula that suit my family, but I still take advantage of free resources.

Please know there are parents who’ve spent a fortune, yet get frustrated by a curriculum because the child is disinterested and/or not thriving. Usually, this is because the curriculum doesn’t fit the child’s preferred learning style. Read the forums! You’ll read all sorts of horror stories regarding the most recommended of curricula. And while these particular materials may work for some children, they do not work for all.

I don’t care who wrote the curriculum, what the author’s credentials are, and how many awards they’ve earned, there is no such thing as a one-size-fits-all curriculum. And just because it costs a fortune doesn’t mean it’s the best fit for your family. I personally know parents who are using free online homeschool curricula and their children are thriving because the parents are involved, innovative, and dedicated. I say this not to steer you away from a boxed curriculum, but to inspire those who cannot afford it. You can do it!

8. Different Types of Homeschoolers

There are all kinds of homeschool families. Some of which are underrepresented on the Web. You don’t have to homeschool the way you see other families on social media do it. Take a look at these alternative methods to homeschool.

  • Eclectic homeschool, or homeschooling that mixes several different learning styles.
  • Classical education, or teaching according to the phases of a child’s cognitive development.
  • Charlotte Mason, or a method that uses real-life experiences to teach a child.
  • Unit studies, or a specific interest that is studied from different angles.
  • Unschooled, or child-led learning that is void of curricula and lesson plans.

I know there’s a stigma against implementing traditional schooling into your homeschool classroom, but hear me out: If this method works for your family, use it! You don’t have to forgo the traditional method just because you’re a homeschool family. In fact, if you have children who are being pulled out of public or private school, they may be most receptive to traditional learning because it’s what they know. That’s okay.

9. You Have Support

Say farewell to the stigma that was once associated with homeschool. Welcome, the days where homeschool has increasingly gained both popularity and respect. The U.S. homeschool population continues to grow each year at a rate anywhere between 2-8 percent. As the population grows, so do social support groups, legal support groups, and resources. The Homeschool Legal Defense Association is probably amongst the most popular support groups. They provide homeschool families with pertinent information regarding homeschool laws, legal services, and may offer peace of mind.

Many public libraries also support homeschoolers. Check out your local library to see what they have to offer. Our local library offers STEM classes, STEM kits, free admissions passes to parks and museums, and much more. Local businesses may also offer “homeschool days” where admission is free or discounted. Our local Skyzone, skating, and bowling center offer homeschool days for a discounted admission. Our state capital building also offers a homeschool day where they give a free tour and low-cost legal classes. Taking advantage of these opportunities is a great way to meet and connect with other homeschool families in your area. So get plugged in!

10. Inevitable Bad Days

If you have a Mary Poppins expectation of what your homeschool days will look like, allow me to bring in a bit of reality—some days will not go so well.  Just as with traditional school, where you’d expect days when your child hates it, expect the same for homeschool. Prepare in advance for how you’d like to handle your uncooperative child (or your uncooperative self!). Here’s what worked for us:

  • Everyone take ten deep breaths—Deep breathing reduces muscle tension, improves mental concentration, and increases the sense of well-being.
  • Let the child talk about it—Sometimes they need to let it all out. Give them a window of opportunity to let their voice be heard.
  • Take a break—Whether it’s just for ten minutes or for the rest of the day. Sometimes we forget that our children need breaks from the monotony of homeschool.
  • Push through—Helping your child to push through something challenging, even when they want to give up, will teach them the value of perseverance.

So, there you have it! Keep in mind that there’s so much pertinent information out there. These are just some of the tips that I’ve found quite useful as a newbie homeschooler, along with other tips I’ve learned along the way. It goes without saying that every homeschool journey is different. So when seeking advice, always consider that you know what works best for your family better than anyone else.

Your Turn!

Let us know in the comments where you are in your homeschool journey and what you’ve learned so far.